The Gleemaiden - The Third of the Sir Richard Straccan books

The Gleemaiden - Sylvian Hamilton

England, 1211

 

Père Raimond … She missed him as she would a limb. For nine years he had been her teacher and her father both, and she could barely remember the time before that. Her life had begun on the day he bought her.

Raimond de Sorules paid one Paris lire for the starveling urchin. He'd heard her singing in the market place, seen her scrabbling in the kennel for the rotten fruit thrown at her by those who thought it funny, and he followed her home. The mother was only too willing to be rid of her.

He scrubbed her in the horse trough at his inn. When he'd got the dirt off, most of it, washed her matted hair and de-loused her, he stood the small trembling body on a barrel and walked around it with a critrical eye, frowning at the raw weals on her knobby back and the bruises and bug-bites on her shins, ribs and arms.

The stable man sold him a pot of smelly salve. It stung, and tears rolled down her face, although she made no sound. He put one of his own shirts on her, far too big, but it would do for the time being. A length of twine served to girdle it so she wouldn't trip on the hem, and the inn-keeper's wife, sorry for the big-eyed waif, plaited her hair in one long, thick braid and tied it with a twist of wool.

That night she ate her fill for the first time in all her seven years.

He made a nest of pillows for her in his bed. Seeing the stark terror in her eyes, he set the great hard bolster firmly between them, but she didn't sleep. Nor did he, and all that night, in the darkness, he could feel her desperate stare.

 

Sylvian Hamilton was a wonder with opening lines. This new book begins:

 

Countess Judith kept her husband's head in a box. At night it perched on a pillow by her side, at meals it sat on the board by her plate …

 

Of course the head goes missing and later comes quite by chance into the possession of Sir Richard Straccan, hero of The Bone-Pedlar and The Pendragon Banner, dealer in sacred relics during the period known as the Interdict, when the whole of England was under interdict and no religious ceremony of any kind was permitted to take place.

 

Inside the splendid, cross-shaped church [Waltham Abbey] the miraculous Black Rood hung over the west door, veiled now, of course, because of the Interdict. None in all England might gaze on the crucified Christ while its king persisted in his wicked flouting of the Pope.

Not that the head of Lord Joceran, Countess Judith's husband, was a sacred relic – far from it.

 

In The Gleemaiden, Straccan sets out to escort an enormous bell from London (where no bells may ring because of the interdict) to the Abbey at Coldinghame, in Scotland (where they are in need of a bell and no interdict exists), but finds himself also excorting the beautiful Roslyn de Sorules, the gleemaiden of the title and her charge, a seven-year-old boy named David; Roslyn and David are refugees from the iniquitous Crusade against the Cathars in the south of France and are even now, in England, being pursued by three knights of the horrifying White Brotherhood, a company of fanatical heretic-hunters used by the Church to track down and eliminate "extreme cases".

 

In the background are Gilla, Braccan's daughter, and Janiva, the healer and wise woman with whom Straccan fell in love during his previous adventure (as readers of the first book will remember), and the spy, Larktwist also makes a welcome reappearance and plays a large role in ths book.

 

Larktwist sniffed. 'What about money?'

Mercredi pushed a purse across the table, and Larktwist secreted it somewhere among his tatters, scratching as he felt the migration of a tribe of lice from armpit to groin.

Mercredi frowned. 'Locksey's a small place; you can't pass as a beggar there, and they'll drive lepers out, so get yourself cleaned up. Look respectable – if you can.'

'Course I can,' said Larktwist, affronted. He knew how to mix with nobs, if the need arose. He hitched his rags about himself with dignity and turned to leave. 'Trust me.'

'A touch of refinement wouldn't go amiss.'

'You want refinement? Easy! I'll be as refined as a nun.'

As he reached the door, Mercredi said, 'And Larktwist …'

'Yes?'

'Stick to him.'

'Oh, I will, sir. Like shit to a blanket.'

 

Another great read, with many memorable scenes, such as the description of one small part of the slaughter that took place during the Albigensian Crusade, and a host of memorable medieval characters.