PRINCESS NEST OF WALES Seductress of the English

Princess Nest of Wales - Kari Maund

This is the kind of biography which, if page after page of speculation is not to become indistinguishable from fiction (and I personally would usually prefer to read a fictitious account of the life of a historical character), it must focus as much or more on the history of the place and period as on the subject of the biography, and this for the simple reason that very little is known about her.

 

" ... like the majority of women in this period, her life went largely unrecorded.Chroniclers, including her grandson Gerald, tell us of her sons and their deeds, but they record nothing of Nest's feelings or beliefs. Her story has to be pieced together from a patchwork of sources ... "

 

But Kari Maund does this successfully. She opens with a brief history of medieval Wales ("Nest's Wales") which is full of details it would be virtually impossible to find elsewhere. (Anyone thinking of writing a novel set in 11th-12th century Wales should start their background reading here!)

 

And what is more, she is refreshingly realistic about the place of women in Celtic society. So many modern writers, all of whom should know better and some of whom I am sure do, create a picture of a utopian world utterly destroyed by the male chauvinist Saxons and Normans. In fact, as Kari Maund observes in her Introduction (and maintains with examples throughout the book) "Despite popular modern myth, medieval Welsh women enjoyed little respect and scant freedom. Legally lifelong minors, they remained pawns in the hands of male kin, incapable of owning land and married off to suit changing political needs. Women in Anglo-Norman England enjoyed wider privileges, and Nest, the daughter of a king, probably found herself accorded an importance she had never experienced before."

 

"Legally lifelong minors": I like that.

 

I liked the whole book. And I liked Nest, of whom I had never even heard before. As Kari makes clear, "the seductress of the English" was quite a lady. The daughter of a Welsh king, the mistress of the Norman English King Henry I (to whom she bore a son), wife of Gerald of Windsor (one of their grandsons was Geraldus Cambriensis, the great historian /chronicler), abducted by Owain ap Cadwgan, son of another Welsh king and leader of resistance against the Normans, later married again, and again, to other Norman lords, who all sought her hand. And it can't have been just her hand that made her so irresistible. It must have been, as George Harrison didn't quite put it, something in the way she walked.