The Gods Themselves

The Gods Themselves - Isaac Asimov

One of the great classic works of SF. 

 

The title is part of a line from a play ("The Maid of Orleans") by the German poet Friedrich Schiller: Against stupidity the gods themselves contend in vain.

 

In the first part of the book, Against Stupidity, the problem of free, clean energy has finally been solved, and the scientist who came up with the solution is universally lauded. Oh, there are a few scientists who consider the whole system, which involves exchanging matter with a para-universe, inherently dangerous, but they are dismissed by everyone as trouble-makers. (And their careers as scientists brought to a dead stop if they dare to speak out.)

 

In Part II, The Gods Themselves, we find ourselves in that "para-universe". This is a stunning creation and the book should be read to experience this other world if for no other reason. It is so, so different, yet so, so believable and real ... and yes, of course, the stupid rule the roost there, too.

 

In Part III, we are on the Moon - our Moon - and again the book would be worth reading just for this depiction of what life on the Moon might be like. This Part is naturally entitled Contend in Vain, but with an important question mark: Contend in Vain? 

 

It would be too easy to spoil this wonderful story, so I will simply finish by saying how happy I am to have rediscovered my early love of Isaac Asimov (my grandmother had all his books) and that I plan on re-reading many more of them.