THE SILVER WOLF

The Silver Wolf  (Legends of the Wolves, Book #1) - Alice Borchardt

Alice Borchardt's The Silver Wolf is set in Rome in the time of the Frankish Emperor Charlemagne, the latter half of the eighth century AD. But the great city is not now what it once was: Regeane didn't know what she'd expected of the once-proud mistress of the world when she'd come to Rome. Certainly not what she found.

 

The inhabitants, descendants of a race of conquerors, lived like rats squabbling and polluting the ruins of an abandoned palace. Oblivious to the evidence of grandeur all around them, they fought viciously among themselves for what wealth remained. Indeed, little was left of the once-vast river of gold that flowed into the eternal city. The gold that could be found gilded the palms of papal officials and the altars of the many churches.

 

And this is true. Life in the Rome of the Dark Ages was squalid and sordid in almost every respect, though as the celebrated courtesan Lucilla points out, it was in some ways an improvement over the past: for instance, the hypocaust that heated the baths of the villa at the end of the first century AD "was fired by slaves who never saw the sun from one end of the year to the other", whereas now, her men "are paid extra to fire the hypocaust and are always happy to do so. ... This world is better than that of the ancients." Maybe. She should know. You will decide for yourself after you have entered it.

 

The book is full of magic and mystery: shape-shifting and werewolves; ghosts, and other spirits, good and evil; involuntary psychometry; astral travel; a miraculous healing – and full, too, of the kind of medieval outsiders I alweays identify with immedieately, for instance the new Pope's mistress, who is accused of witchcraft by his enemies; a female werewolf named Matrona, who has been alive "since the beginning of time"; and a one-time leading intellectual beauty and arbiter of fashion, now with no nose and living in a convent in Rome.

 

Regeane is a werewolf, as was her father before her. When the book opens, she is being held prisoner (a steel collar and chain in a locked room with a barred window) by her sadistic uncle, who is of course aware of her "affliction" but wants her to go through with the marriage anyway then kill, or help him kill, her husband, who is very rich. He will pocket the proceeds and continue to "supervise" (his word) his niece. Thanks to Lucilla, the Pope's mistress, she manages to avoid this fate, but as the Queen of the Dead later tells Regeane, "Woman Wolf, the road to paradise is through the gates of hell," and Regeane does indeed go through these gates and through hell (and we with her) before she achieves happiness.

 

The writing is superb, and some of the lines unforgetable. I could quote all night, but how about this? "I have often thought if one could impart the doings of humankind to a rose, the only thing it would understand would be the sweet, drawn-out lovemaking of a drowsy afternoon."

 

Nevertheless, it is in describing the relationship between the woman and the wolf that the book most distinguishes itself. For understand that this is not one person shape-shifting, it is two distinct personalities - two utterly different personalities, one a woman, one a wolf - both occupying the same two, interchangeable, bodies. It is, so far as I know, absolutely original and quite unique. Normally the shape-shifter is the villain of the piece, but here the wolf is no creature of horror, she is something natural and marvellous, while the woman, Regeane, is the heroine. We feel everything she feels - and everything the wolf feels - experience everything they experience; and from the first page, and right till the end, identify with her - with them - completely.