Lost Cause

Lost Cause (A Daisy Dunlop Mystery Book 1) - JL Simpson

I was given a free copy of this book by the author via Booklikes in exchange for an honest review.

 

I found Lost Cause quite hard to get into – might even have given up had I not agreed to write a review. I'll come back to why I found the earlier part of the book somewhat off-putting in a moment.

 

First, let me say that the book is professionally produced in every way. The writing, the editing, are both impeccable. Not even one of those peculiar errors we seem to be becoming inured to like the meaningless "I could care less". No, here the narrator says she "couldn't care less". Bingo.

 

But how to classify this story? It is called a "mystery" – Daisy Dunlop Mystery Book 1. There are several mysteries, but which one is the mystery I really couldn't say. It is certainly not a thriller, and though it is a crime story, the rather complex crime and the various bit-part criminals are not really what the book is about. Nor is it a romance, a love-story. The protagonist, Daisy Dunlop, is the mother of a teenage son and almost absurdly happily married to her husband Paul. There is no way she would ever be unfaithful to him. Yet she does flirt, often outrageously, with almost every male she meets. Especially the "Irish git" (her words) that her husband has arranged for her to work alongside as a trainee P.I. and heir-hunter. Both the husband and his friend "Solomon" (the Irish git) assume that after a few days she will abandon this ridiculous idea.

 

Really, the story is about the relationship between Daisy and Solomon. It is this flirting that you remember when you finish the book on one last outrageous line from Daisy. A flirtation story, then. But beautifully done.

 

Which brings me back to my problem with the opening chapters. Daisy's husband, Paul, and his mate Solomon are both big, hard, rich, clever, arrogant men. Alpha males. And Daisy is the obedient strawberry-blonde. Well, not always obedient. Far from it. But when she disobeys one of them she invariably feels guilty, and frequently lands herself in a load of trouble from which Solomon must ride in on his white charger (actually an Aston Martin) and rescue her.

 

Me, I like strong female leads. The stronger the better. And yet I identified with Daisy more and more as the book went on and she began to find her feet (not easy on those heels) till by the end she was saving Solomon (all right, causing some typical dumb-blonde chaos in doing so) and I had made up my mind I would definitely read Daisy Dunlop Mysteries Book 2. I also very much liked the gradual focus on homeless people, whom Daisy decides really are "the secret eyes and ears of the world".

 

Four stars then, and I suspect that the next book will get four-and-a-half or five.