Morality Play

Morality Play - Barry Unsworth

 As is so often the case with the late Barry Unsworth's novels, the reader finds herself living the life of an outsider, in this case a whole gallery of typically medieval outsiders: a young priest on the road, outside his diocese and therefore outside the law; a troupe of impoverished strolling players struggling to survive in the middle of winter; a whore,down on her luck, travelling with the players; a group of religious dissenters, the Brethren of the Spirit ... And all involved in what can only be described as a literary medieval mystery.

 

It was a death that began it all and another death that led us on. The first was of the man called Brendan and I saw the moment of it. I saw them gather round and crouch over him in the bitter cold, then start back to give the soul passage. It was as if they played his death for me and this was a strange thing, as they did not know I watched, and I did not then know what they were.

 

Thus the story opens. The young priest, Nicholas Barber, freezing cold (having lost his cloak in a narrow escape from an irate husband who returned unexpectedly) and starving hungry, happens upon a death scene being performed by a company of players; only the death is real  and because of the death the players are one man short: Nicholas is co-opted.

  

He travels north towards Durham with them (they have been ordered to perform at Durham Castle on Christmas Day) but before they can get there they are caught up in the death of a child - a boy, Thomas Wells - and the story of the young woman accused of murdering him.

  

It is not, though, your typical medieval mystery. There is no sleuth as such.The players simply need money to continue their journey north and the only way they can lay hands on any is to perform a play that will attract an audience. Martin, their leader, decides to perform a "true play", the play of this local murder; but to perform a play based on such a thing is quite unheard of. "Who plays things that are done in the world?" demands one of the shocked players when Martin suggests it. 

 

Then, when they perform it, they find it is false: it does not work.

 

The whole first half of the book builds up to the performance of the first Play of Thomas Wells (which they subsequently rename The False Play of Thomas Wells) and its follow-up, The True Play of Thomas Wells; the second half of the book is the traumatic if not finally tragic sequel to these performances.

 

As a player, Nicholas sees everything, from medieval life in the raw -

 

I saw the beggar who had come to our fire and spoken of lost children. An egg had fallen and smashed below the stall, where the snow was trodden. The yolk of the egg made a yellow smear on the snow and a raw-boned dog saw it at the same time as the beggar did and both made for it and the beggar kicked the dog, which yelped and held back but did not run, hunger making him bold. The beggar cupped his hands and scooped up the egg in the snow and took it into his mouth and ate all together, the egg and the fragments of shell and the snow 

 

- to a great joust. Nicholas, imprisoned in a castle tower, watches the joust taking place in the lists below and realises that the knights and nobles too are performing in their own play; and later sees a dying knight, mortally wounded in the joust, with "no role left to play but this last one of dying, that comes to all."

 

Fine writing. And a fine story with, as I say, some great characters and a vivid reconstructionof the life of those particular outsiders known as players whom we now think of as central to the culture of an age and place and people.